Item #366806 88th Congress 1st Session. S. 1732 ... A Bill To eliminate discrimination in public accommodations affecting interstate commerce. Civil Rights Act of 1964.
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Early Senate Draft of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

88th Congress 1st Session. S. 1732 ... A Bill To eliminate discrimination in public accommodations affecting interstate commerce.

Washington, D.C: June 19, 1963.

Price: $3,500.00


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9, [3]pp. Small folio (11x7-1/2 inches). Early Senate Draft of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Stapled self-wrappers, as issued.

Item #366806

Martin Luther King Jr.'s Birmingham campaign in the spring of 1963 proved a watershed moment in the civil rights movement, leading directly to the shift in President John F. Kennedy's position on civil rights, with the President announcing in a televised address to the American people on June 11, 1963 the urgent need for civil rights legislation. On June 19, Kennedy sent his civil rights bill to Congress, calling for the enforcement of voting rights, equal accommodations in public facilities, provisions for the Attorney General to initiate school desegregation suits, new programs to ensure fair employment practices such as support of a Fair Employment Practice Committee, the establishment of a Community Relations Service, and the granting of authority to the federal government to withhold funds from programs and activities in which discrimination had occurred.

Senate Majority leader Mike Mansfield (D, Montana) immediately took Kennedy's proposal and on June 19 introduced it as three bills within the Senate. The first, S. 1731, comprising the exact text of the administration's proposal, was read twice and referred to the Senate Judiciary Committee. The second, S. 1732 [i.e. the present printing], included only the second article of the administration's proposal, i.e. the section regarding discrimination in public accommodations, which was read twice and referred to the Senate Commerce Committee. The final bill, S. 1750, containing the text of S. 1731 but without the text of S. 1732, was likewise read and referred to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

The Judiciary Committee held hearings on S. 1731 in July to September 1963, made some amendments, but neither S.1731 nor S.1750 was ever reported out of committee. The Senate Commerce Committee held their hearings on S.1732 in July to August 1963 and reported the bill out of committee with various amendments on February 10, 1964. But with the House version of the Civil Rights Act (H.R. 7152) proceeding through its process, the Senate chose to wait for its passage to consider amending that bill before taking up its own.

Nevertheless, the present June 19, 1963 slip bill printing of the Senate bills respecting discrimination in public accommodations encompasses among the earliest Congressional drafts of what would become the monumental Civil Rights Act of 1964.