Item #345255 Philosophiae naturalis Principia mathematica. Auctore Isaaco Newtonio Equite Aurato. Editio Secunda Auctior et Emendatior. Sir Isaac Newton.
Philosophiae naturalis Principia mathematica. Auctore Isaaco Newtonio Equite Aurato. Editio Secunda Auctior et Emendatior
Philosophiae naturalis Principia mathematica. Auctore Isaaco Newtonio Equite Aurato. Editio Secunda Auctior et Emendatior
Philosophiae naturalis Principia mathematica. Auctore Isaaco Newtonio Equite Aurato. Editio Secunda Auctior et Emendatior
Philosophiae naturalis Principia mathematica. Auctore Isaaco Newtonio Equite Aurato. Editio Secunda Auctior et Emendatior
Philosophiae naturalis Principia mathematica. Auctore Isaaco Newtonio Equite Aurato. Editio Secunda Auctior et Emendatior
Philosophiae naturalis Principia mathematica. Auctore Isaaco Newtonio Equite Aurato. Editio Secunda Auctior et Emendatior
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The Second Principia

Philosophiae naturalis Principia mathematica. Auctore Isaaco Newtonio Equite Aurato. Editio Secunda Auctior et Emendatior.

Cambridge: [Cornelius Crownfield AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS], 1713.

The second edition, expanded and corrected, and the first to include the General Scholium in which Newton gives a general resumé of the work. One of about 750 copies printed, of which 250 were sent to Holland and France. Engraved vignette on title, one folding engraved plate, and numerous woodcut diagrams and illustrations in the text. [28], 484, [8] pp. 1 vols. 4to. The Second Principia. Contemporary paneled calf, neatlty rebacked, with pencil notes in the text ESTC T93210; Wallis 8; Grey 8; Babson 12; DSB X, p. 64; for the first edition of the PRINCIPIA (1687), see: PMM 161 (FIRST EDITION); Dibner 11; Horblit 78; Norman 1586. Item #345255

The critical second edition of what is incontestably the single most important scientific work ever published, one which laid the foundations for modern physics. Published in Newton’s lifetime by his friend and collaborater, Roger Cotes (1682-1716), this edition contains for the first time Cotes’ Preface which lays out Newton’s method, a 7 pp. Index, and most importantly, Newton’s own celebrated conclusion entitled SCHOLIUM GENERALE (pp. 481-484), written in response to the objections of Berkeley and Leibniz, in which the author expresses the religious conceptions underlying and supporting his empirical-mathematical construct.
“Copernicus, Galileo and Kepler had certainly shown the way; but where they described the phenomena they observed, Newton explained the underlying universal laws. The PRINCIPIA provided the great synthesis of the cosmos, proving finally its physical unity. Newton showed that the important and dramatic aspects of nature that were subject to the universal law of gravitation could be explained, in mathematical terms, within a single physical theory. With him the separation of natural and supernatural, of sublunar and superlunar worlds disappeared. The same laws of gravitation and motion rule everywhere; for the first time a single mathematical law could explain the motion of objects on earth as well as the phenomena of the heavens. The whole cosmos is composed of inter-connecting parts influencing each other according to these laws” (PMM).

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