A Little Plain English, addressed to the People of the United States, on the Treaty, Negociated with his Britannic Majesty and on the Conduct of the president relative thereto; in answer to “The Letters of Franklin.” With a Supplement containing an Account of the Turbulent and Factious Procedings of the Opposers of the Treaty. By Peter Porcupine. William Cobbett.
A Little Plain English, addressed to the People of the United States, on the Treaty, Negociated with his Britannic Majesty and on the Conduct of the president relative thereto; in answer to “The Letters of Franklin.” With a Supplement containing an Account of the Turbulent and Factious Procedings of the Opposers of the Treaty. By Peter Porcupine
A Little Plain English, addressed to the People of the United States, on the Treaty, Negociated with his Britannic Majesty and on the Conduct of the president relative thereto; in answer to “The Letters of Franklin.” With a Supplement containing an Account of the Turbulent and Factious Procedings of the Opposers of the Treaty. By Peter Porcupine
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A Little Plain English, addressed to the People of the United States, on the Treaty, Negociated with his Britannic Majesty and on the Conduct of the president relative thereto; in answer to “The Letters of Franklin.” With a Supplement containing an Account of the Turbulent and Factious Procedings of the Opposers of the Treaty. By Peter Porcupine.

Philadelphia: Published by Thomas Bradford, Printer, Bookseller and Stationer, No. 8, South Front Street, 1795.

First edition. Half-title with copyright notice on verso. Pp. 8, 111, [1]. 1 vols. 8vo. Later blue cloth Evans 28437; Pearl 8; Gaine 7c. Item #324090

The "Letters of Franklin" were published in the "Philadelphia Aurora" in a series of articles that are attributed to Alexander James Dallas, a Jamaican-born Scot, who emigrated to the United States in 1783. He was a lawyer and is noted as having, with Hallam, atempted to introduce regular theatre to Philadelphia. He was also on the Committee of Correspondence that organized the first Democratic society in the United States in 1793 and published several pieces including "Features of Mr. Jay's Treaty" (1795). He was violently opposed to a Treaty with Britain and drew Cobbett's fire. With the publication of an abstract of the proposed Treaty in June 1795 in the "Aurora" demonstrations broke out.

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