Item #324065 ... All Hail the Happy Day! May 24, 1883. New York and Brooklyn Suspension Bridge ... [Chromolithographed fan with a view of the newly-completed Brooklyn Bridge, given out at the opening ceremonies ]. Brooklyn Bridge.
... All Hail the Happy Day! May 24, 1883. New York and Brooklyn Suspension Bridge ... [Chromolithographed fan with a view of the newly-completed Brooklyn Bridge, given out at the opening ceremonies ]

... All Hail the Happy Day! May 24, 1883. New York and Brooklyn Suspension Bridge ... [Chromolithographed fan with a view of the newly-completed Brooklyn Bridge, given out at the opening ceremonies ].

New York: Eckstein, Hoffmann & Porr, 1883.

Chromolithographed view on recto, text on verso. 9 inches round with scalloped edges, mounted to a wooden handle, as issued. Window box frame. Overall framed dimensions approx. 20 x 12-1/2 inches Last, The Color Explosion, p. 182. Item #324065

The opening of the Brooklyn Bridge was a major event. The New York Times reported: “The pleasant weather brought visitors by the thousands from all around. … It is estimated that over 50,000 people came in by the railroads alone, and swarms by the sound boats and by the ferry-boats helped to swell the crowds in both cities. … The opening of the bridge was decidedly Brooklyn’s celebration. New York’s participation in it was meager, save as to the crowd which thronged her streets.” Dubbed the eighth wonder of the world, besides being the longest suspension bridge erected to date, the towers were the highest man-made structures in all of North America.

The text on verso gives the bridge's dimensions, its board of trustees and principal engineers, a short history, and a note on workers lost during construction. The fan was given out at the opening of the bridge as a promotional item by Cowperthwait's, the venerable furniture, carpet and other household store founded by John K. Cowperthwait in 1807 at Chatham Square. In the foreground of the view, one of the ships is named Cowperthwait and on verso below the text are images of Cowperthwait's two locations.The chromolithographers -- Eckstein, Hoffmann & Porr -- mainly produced trade cards and cigar labels, and existed under various partnerships from 1881-1891. The only other example of this fan we could locate is in the Jay T. Last collection at the Huntington (priJLC_HHD, Subseries B, Box 1, Folder 2).

A rare and extremely ephemeral relic from the opening the Brooklyn Bridge.

Price: $1,500.00 Free International Delivery