No union with slaveholders !! ... [and] Am I not a Man and a Brother [Two cross-stitched Abolitionist Bible markers]. Abolition.
No union with slaveholders !! ... [and] Am I not a Man and a Brother [Two cross-stitched Abolitionist Bible markers]
No union with slaveholders !! ... [and] Am I not a Man and a Brother [Two cross-stitched Abolitionist Bible markers]
New Arrival

No union with slaveholders !! ... [and] Am I not a Man and a Brother [Two cross-stitched Abolitionist Bible markers].

[United States: ca. 1850s].

Perforated paper, silk thread and satin ribbon. The first in green silk, 1-1/4 x 8-1/2 on an 18-inch chartreuse ribbon; and the second in gold thread on two panels 1-3/8 x 7 and 1-3/8 x 6-1/4 on a 24-inch raspberry ribbon. 1 vols. Needlework fine. The first with the ribbon trimmed one side, the second ribbon torn at fold between the two panels Item #322831

Two finely executed needlework Bible or book markers, using the craft of stitching on perforated paper, and bearing Abolitionist slogans within ornamental borders. The cry of non-compromise, No union with slaveholders, was first uttered by Wendell Phillips in an 1844 speech, and the second slogan dates back to the Wedgwood medallion.

Women proved essential leaders in the abolitionist movement as speakers and writers, but also as organizers of fairs and local societies and in the production and distribution of abolitionist material culture. "Women’s fair and fundraising work was a key source of income for the antislavery movement through the 1840s and 1850s, one that enabled their political participation while maintaining associations with domestic feminity. These fairs were sophisticated operations, organized by large committees of women and featuring, for sale, 'domestic crafts' that otherwise would have been understood as products of the unremunerated labors of a refined, genteel woman, rather than politicized objects or objects sold for compensation. The sale of handkerchiefs, needle books, fancywork embroidery, workbags, and other crafts at antislavery fairs and bazaars gave women the opportunity to see themselves as political actors and earners, while still drawing on the associations with domesticity, morality, sewing circles, and women’s 'benevolent work.' These fairs confirmed both the economic value of women’s domestic ('ornamental') pursuits and their political force; many of the objects sold both materially and aesthetically announced their makers’ (and purchasers’) political commitments." (Gruner, "Soft Politics: The Frictions of Abolitionist Women's Needlework" in Sequitur, vol. 5, no. 1 [December 2018]).

Price: $2,500.00 Free International Delivery