Typed letter signed "John Macy" (John Albert Macy) to "Mr. Halpern" (Seymour Halpern) in response to Halpern's inquiry regarding the key to success in life. Helen Keller, John Albert Macy.
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'I Do Not Consider Myself Successful'

Typed letter signed "John Macy" (John Albert Macy) to "Mr. Halpern" (Seymour Halpern) in response to Halpern's inquiry regarding the key to success in life.

New York: August 19, 1931.

1p. on personal letterhead. 8-1/2 x 11 inches. 'I Do Not Consider Myself Successful'. Old folds, else very good. Item #310605

An overly modest letter from the literary critic and writer best remembered today for his role in the editing and publication of Helen Keller’s, The Story of My Life (1903). Reading in part: “As I do not consider myself successful it is impossible to answer your question.”

John Albert Macy (1877-1932) was married to Keller's teacher, Anne Sullivan, from 1905 until their separation in 1914. An ardent socialist and author of Socialism in America (1915) Macy corresponded and shared his political views with writers such as Upton Sinclair, and had a strong influence on Helen Keller, who joined the socialist party in 1909. Among his works as a literary critic are are The Spirit of American Literature (1913), The Critical Game (1922), and The Story of the World's Literature (1925). Macy was also an officer in the P.E.N. club, an international society of authors.

As a high school student, Seymour Halpern (1913-1997), wrote letters to many notables of the day including politicians, military officers, entertainers, diplomats, artists, activists, writers, and businessmen, inquiring about their ideas to the keys to success in life. Halpern would later go on to serve as Republican from New York to the 86th, 87th, 88th, 89th, 90th, 91st and 92nd United States Congresses, holding office from January 3, 1959, to January 3, 1973.

Price: $100.00