Theriaki and Their Last Dose. Letters of FitzHugh Ludlow and Others, to Dr. Samuel B. Collins, Relating to the Most Wonderful Medical Discovery of the Age. Opium, Dr. Samuel B. Collins.
Theriaki and Their Last Dose. Letters of FitzHugh Ludlow and Others, to Dr. Samuel B. Collins, Relating to the Most Wonderful Medical Discovery of the Age
Theriaki and Their Last Dose. Letters of FitzHugh Ludlow and Others, to Dr. Samuel B. Collins, Relating to the Most Wonderful Medical Discovery of the Age

Rare Work on Treating Opium Addiction

Theriaki and Their Last Dose. Letters of FitzHugh Ludlow and Others, to Dr. Samuel B. Collins, Relating to the Most Wonderful Medical Discovery of the Age.

Chicago: Evening Journal Print, No. 46 Dearborn Street, 1870.

First edition (possibly a later state). 73, [3] pp. 1 vols. 8vo. Rare Work on Treating Opium Addiction. Original blue morocco, title blocked in gilt on upper cover, leafy roll border to boards, marbled endsheets. Some rubbing Cordasco 70-021. Item #304527

First edition of this work on opium addiction in the U.S., concerning the discovery of a patent cure of Opium addiction by Samuel B. Collins, and his correspondence with Fitz Hugh Ludlow, editor of the Easy Chair column in Harper’s and an acknowledged opium addict. Ludlow had published several chapters in The Opium Habit, with Suggestions as to the Remedy (1868). Collins titles the first section An Answer to "What Shall They Do To Be Saved?".

The work shows signs of being hastily printed, referring to letters dated June 1870 and the Harper’s column for August 1870. The last few pages are set in a smaller font (but forming part of the last gathering), and record a dispute with Henry Read over the marketing of Collins’ cure, and pledges of testimonials to be published in the Easy Chair that were never honored because of Ludlow’s death; the last page bears memorial bands across top and bottom and begins: “A letter conveying the mournful tidings of the death of Fitz Hugh Ludlow was received by Dr. Collins …”; the elegy concludes “… for He has found the Fountain of Eternal Youth, Fitz Hugh Ludlow can never grow old.” Ludlow died in Switzerland on 12 September 1870.

Scarce institutionally and in the trade. Only the copy recorded at the Toner Collection, Library of Congress (shelfmark RC371.O6 C7 1870a) has pagination similar to this copy. It appears to have been regularly reprinted: a sixth edition is noted with date 1871 (Library Company of Philadelphia). A copy digitized at the National Library of Medicine (http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/66640200R ) bears the date 1870 on the title page but the pagination is different and the book manifestly printed later (blurred type in the imprint and the text on page 69 referring to a letter dated 26 January 1871); the digitized copy from the Library of Congress has a date of 1870 on the title but a preliminary page bears an accession stamp dated 1881; this would appear to be the copy cited by Cordasco (109 pp.).

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