The History of the Indian Mutiny: Giving a Detailed Account of the Sepoy Insurrection in India; and a Concise History of the Great Military Events which have Tended to Consolidate British Empire in Hindostan. Charles Ball.
The History of the Indian Mutiny: Giving a Detailed Account of the Sepoy Insurrection in India; and a Concise History of the Great Military Events which have Tended to Consolidate British Empire in Hindostan
The History of the Indian Mutiny: Giving a Detailed Account of the Sepoy Insurrection in India; and a Concise History of the Great Military Events which have Tended to Consolidate British Empire in Hindostan
The History of the Indian Mutiny: Giving a Detailed Account of the Sepoy Insurrection in India; and a Concise History of the Great Military Events which have Tended to Consolidate British Empire in Hindostan
The History of the Indian Mutiny: Giving a Detailed Account of the Sepoy Insurrection in India; and a Concise History of the Great Military Events which have Tended to Consolidate British Empire in Hindostan
The History of the Indian Mutiny: Giving a Detailed Account of the Sepoy Insurrection in India; and a Concise History of the Great Military Events which have Tended to Consolidate British Empire in Hindostan

The History of the Indian Mutiny: Giving a Detailed Account of the Sepoy Insurrection in India; and a Concise History of the Great Military Events which have Tended to Consolidate British Empire in Hindostan.

London and New York: London Printing and Publishing Company, Limited, [1858-1859].

Early Edition. Illustrated with steel engravings of battle scenes, views of palaces, portraits and maps, frontispiece. 2 vols. Small 4to. Bound in contemporary three-quarters green pebbled morocco marbled edges and endpapers, foredges chipped, corners bumped and rubbed, spines bumped, else VG C. A. Bayly, The Raj, p. 231. Item #261775

The Rebellion (or “Mutiny”) of 1857 in India has been the center of much historical controversy. Indian historians remain divided as to the nature of the rebellion; “Some see it as a popular rebellion betrayed by the landed ‘ruling classes’” who ultimately surrendered and cooporated with the civil officers, while others see it as “a full-blown nationalist movement, uniting all classes,” which is the official view advanced by the Indian media even today. British historians today no longer deny the latter view, but still stress local and individual motives. Despite the differences in opinions on the nature of the rebellion, historians do agree on its several causes. Military reform by the British threatened the privileges and special status enjoyed by the Indian troops of the Bengal army, the sepoys. The rebellion also found its roots in the Ganges plains and in central India, where oppressed small land-holders, peasant farmers, nomads and unsettled peoples from the ‘fringes,’ suffering under unjust taxation, rose together against both rival Indians and the symbols of Company authority. Ultimately, the British justified the suppression of the rebellion and the attack on Delhi as retribution for the deaths of British civilians early on in the uprising (The Raj).

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