Autograph Letter signed, to Hon. Isaac Wayne, Congressman from Pennsylvania and son of the Revolutionary War hero General Anthony Wayne. James Buchanan.

Predicting 1828 - a Letter to the Son of “Mad Anthony” Wayne

Autograph Letter signed, to Hon. Isaac Wayne, Congressman from Pennsylvania and son of the Revolutionary War hero General Anthony Wayne.

Washington, D.C: 4 May, 1826.

2 full pages. 1 vols. 4to. Predicting 1828 - a Letter to the Son of “Mad Anthony” Wayne. Fine, in half red morocco drop box. Item #247003

A superb letter in which the future President discusses candidly the prospects of the candidates in the 1828 Presidential election — John Quincy Adams vs. Andrew Jackson. Buchanan had originally been a supporter of Henry Clay when he first went to Congress, but in the election of 1824, he supported Andrew Jackson. Famously, that election was decided by the House of Representatives when Clay threw his support to John Quincy Adams, thus defeating Jackson, who had won a plurality of the electoral vote. Writing to his fellow Congressman from Pennsylvania, Buchanan observes:

“…I think … that the fate of Mr. [John Quincy] Adams in the next contest is already determined. He cannot be re-elected unless Gen. Jackson should in the mean time die or be rendered unable to discharge the duties of President. We have no reason to apprehend either of these events; as his health is now much better than it has been for several years. Doubt no longer rest upon the course which will be pursued by Virginia, North Carolina & Georgia. New York will without doubt be hostile to the re-election of Mr. Adams; and if it has not yet, like the three States I have mentioned, taken any decided course, it is on account of their local politics.

Jackson has nothing to fear from Adams in that State; though it is possible Clinton may give him trouble.

“Conjecture is busy upon the subject, who will be the successor of Mr. King? Some think it will be Mr. Webster whilst other say Mr. Brown will be sent to England & Mr Gallatin take his station at Paris. I have no data on which to form an opinion. - The whole course of the administration has proved that every appointment is made either with a view of rewarding past services or of obtaining new friends. Mr. Clay is, between you & myself, the President …”.

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