Autograph Letter, Signed (“F.E. Spinner”) to Angling author George Dawson, dated Jacksonville, Florida, Feby. 19, 1876, discussing Dawson’s book of “fish letters” (Pleasures of Angling … [1876]), recounting a fish tale, and praising Florida winters. Florida, Francis E. Spinner.
Autograph Letter, Signed (“F.E. Spinner”) to Angling author George Dawson, dated Jacksonville, Florida, Feby. 19, 1876, discussing Dawson’s book of “fish letters” (Pleasures of Angling … [1876]), recounting a fish tale, and praising Florida winters

The First Florida Retiree

Autograph Letter, Signed (“F.E. Spinner”) to Angling author George Dawson, dated Jacksonville, Florida, Feby. 19, 1876, discussing Dawson’s book of “fish letters” (Pleasures of Angling … [1876]), recounting a fish tale, and praising Florida winters.

Jacksonville, Florida: February 19, 1876.

4 pp., pen and ink on a single folded sheet. 1 vols. 12mo. The First Florida Retiree. Old folds. Fine Item #244152

“Spinner, a strong nationalist, was an important adviser to Chase on matters such as the circulation of greenbacks (which bore Spinner's distinctive, hard-to-duplicate signature) and the creation of a national banking system. … Needing large numbers of reliable employees not subject to military service, he was the first governmental administrator to turn to women. He vigorously defended their employment against critics, hired over one hundred, paid them well by the standards of the time, and insisted on their continued employment after the war. … When a new secretary of the treasury in 1875 assumed control over the appointment of clerks, however, Spinner feared that dishonest people might be hired and he would be held responsible. He resigned and moved to Jacksonville, Florida, where he enjoyed a vigorous outdoor life until his death in that city.” (ANB)
Francis E. Spinner (1802-1890) served as Treasurer of the United States under Presidents Lincoln, Johnson, and Grant. In the angling world, he is notable as the recipient of letters from Oliver Gibbs, published as Lake Pepin Fish-Chowder (1869). In retirement in Florida, he writes to George Dawson, editor of the Albany Evening Journal and a noted American angling author, whose Pleasures of Angling with Rod and Reel (1876) is the first American book devoted to fly fishing. Spinner writes, “I am so glad to learn that you have been persuaded to publish your fish letters, in book form … when yours comes out, it will be read with pleasure.” He then goes on to describe fishing for trout on McGirt’s Creek, a tributary of the St. Johns River, and catching a cat fish of 18-1/2 pounds “on one of Chapman’s ‘No. 4 Minnow bait’ … I mention this, because I cannot learn from anyone, that a cat fish was ever known before to strike at artificial bait.” Spinner concludes lyrically, “The orange, and other of the citrus family, are in bloom now … Whoever, at the North, that can afford to, and who has nothing else to do, and that does not spend his winters in this Elysium, is to be pitied. Do come.”
An excellent letter with outstanding content.

Price: $1,000.00 Free International Delivery