The Buried Moon (“In her frantic struggles the hood of her cloak fell back from her dazzling golden hair, and immediately the whole place was flooded with light”). Edmund Dulac.
The Buried Moon (“In her frantic struggles the hood of her cloak fell back from her dazzling golden hair, and immediately the whole place was flooded with light”)

The Buried Moon (“In her frantic struggles the hood of her cloak fell back from her dazzling golden hair, and immediately the whole place was flooded with light”).

1916.

Watercolor, pencil and ink, signed "Edmund Dulac 16" (lower right) and titled in his hand beneath. 12-5/8 x 11 in. Matted and framed. Exhibited: Scott & Fowles, 1916 catalogue, no. 46 ("Lent by James G. Heaslet"). Literature: Edmund Dulac's Fairy-Book (Hodder & Stoughton, 1916), p. 8; Hughey, Edmund Dulac: His Book Illustrations, no. 47. Item #100087

Superb and striking original illustration for “The Buried Moon” from Edmund Dulac's Fairy-Book: Fairy Tales of the Allied Nations, his 1916 collection of fairy stories from the different Allied lands, published by Hodder & Stoughton as their widely publicized Christmas gift book. "This book received even more attention in New York than in England. The 15 illustrations formed the centerpiece of Dulac's first American exhibition, when 70 of his works were shown during December 1916 at Scott and Fowles Gallery … On December 3, The New York Times Magazine published a reproduction of 'The Friar and the Boy' and announced the opening of the exhibit with a detailed critique … During this period of his work, Dulac had immersed himself in the artistic traditions of folklore. He was partly stimulated by his friendship with Yeats (whose interest in Celtic folklore was legendary)" (Hughey).

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